Herbs

chive1

Garlic chives

Garlic chives are such a worthwhile herb to include in the vegie patch. They’re perennial, providing an extended harvest of mild garlic-onion flavoured leaves, as well as very pretty edible and bee-attracting white flowers. Try growing garlic chives as an attractive border around vegie beds or in amongst fruit trees.

Yates® Garlic Chives can be sown during February, direct where they are to grow. They’ll grow in either full sun or a partly shaded spot and also make a great container plant.

Seeds will take around 2 – 3 weeks to germinate (so be patient) and you can start harvesting leaves after around 2 months. Continuous harvesting will help promote new growth.

Feed garlic chives regularly by applying Yates Thrive® Natural Vegie & Herb Organic Based Pelletised Plant Food around the root zone. This will provide the chives with fast acting nutrients to promote lots of delicious leaves and organic ingredients that provide gentle slow release feeding and help to improve the quality of the soil.

Delicious recipe ideas with garlic chives: garlic chive scrambled eggs, noodles with beef & garlic chives, rice with chilli & garlic chives, cornmeal cheddar cheese garlic chive biscuits, pork and garlic chive dumplings and Pad Thai with garlic chives.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Bolting basil

Basil can bolt to seed during hot weather so trim back flowering stems or leave the flowers for the bees to enjoy and sow more Yates Sweet Basil seed during February to keep up a constant supply of basil’s flavoursome and fragrant leaves.

Basil won’t mind a bit of shade during really hot weather, so plant it among other vegies and even in the garden where shrubs offer some shade. Liquid feed each week using Yates® Thrive® Vegie & Herb Liquid Plant Food, which will encourage lots of lovely leafy growth.


Comments

This area is for general comments from members of the public. Some questions or comments may not receive a reply from Yates. For specific gardening advice visit Ask an expert Alternatively you may wish to contact us.

Annual Garden Calender