Vegetables

cabbage

More than coleslaw

Cabbage has so much more kitchen potential that coleslaw! Fill cabbage leaves with mince to make cabbage rolls, add finely shredded cabbage to mashed potato and use cabbage in Asian potstickers and gyozas. Yum! It’s time to grow your own cabbage so you have this versatile ingredient ready at your back door.

Yates® Cabbage ‘Sugarloaf’" is a conical shaped, sweet flavoured crisp and tender cabbage that matures quickly. It’s hardy and reliable, so is great for the home gardener.

Here’s how to start your cabbages:

There are 3 main pests that target cabbages – snails, slugs and caterpillars.

Snails and slugs can devour young seedlings and also slime their way in amongst the leaves of the developing cabbage head. To prevent this happening, lightly scatter some Yates Blitzem® Snail & Slug Pellets around the plants, which will effectively attract and kill snails and slugs.

Caterpillars also like to munch through cabbages, particularly the caterpillars of the cabbage white butterfly. Yates Nature’s Way® Caterpillar Killer , which is based on naturally occurring soil bacteria, will control caterpillars on cabbages. Spray the cabbages every week, ensuring leaves are sprayed to the point of run off. Yates Nature’s Way® Caterpillar Killer is certified for use in organic gardening so is perfect for people wanting to use organic methods of insect pest control.

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Mitey protection
Beans_Img

Beans can be wonderfully productive during February. For the beans that make it into the kitchen (that are not devoured right there in the vegie patch!), there are lots of delicious salads and stir fries to make, or perhaps blanch and freeze a few packs for future use.

Healthy, well fed beans can continue to produce pods well into autumn however mites are one of the pests that can bring about the demise of bean plants.

Mites, also called spider and two spotted mites, are at the most prolific during summer’s hot weather and they particularly like dry conditions. Watch for bean leaves starting to look yellow and mottled as you could have a mite infestation. Mites are literally sucking the life out of the leaves! Large populations of mites create masses of fine spidery webbing in between leaves and stems, which is often when a mite infestation is first noticed (as the mites themselves are very tiny).

Mites can be controlled with weekly sprays of Yates® Mancozeb Plus Garden Fungicide & Miticide, which contains sulfur, which is an effective miticide. The mancozeb component of Yates Mancozeb Plus is a broad spectrum fungicide and will control common bean diseases such as leaf spots and anthracnose (which can infect both the leaves and the pods). So by using Yates Mancozeb Plus Garden Fungicide & Miticide on your beans during summer, you can keep both mites and diseases under control with the one product.

Continue to keep bean plants well-watered during February and feed them each week with Yates Thrive® Flower & Fruit Soluble Plant Fertiliser to promote healthy leaf growth and lots of bean pods. It’s as simple as mixing 2 spoonfuls in a 9 L watering can and applying over the leaves and root zone.


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